WHERE ART
WHERE ART
WHERE ART
WHERE ART
WHERE ART
WHERE ART
WHERE ART

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

WHERE ART

MEETS FASHION

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol
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Like his contemporaries Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg, Warhol wryly responded to the mass media of the 1960s. Obsessed with celebrity, consumer culture, and mechanical (re)production, Pop artist Andy Warhol created some of the most iconic images of the 20th century. Warhol drew widely from popular culture and everyday subject matter, creating works like his 32 Campbell's Soup Cans (1962), Brillo pad box sculptures, and portraits of Marilyn Monroe, using the medium of silk-screen printmaking to achieve his characteristic hard edges and flat areas of color. Quick to realize the cult of celebrity, the Factory acted as a hub for fashionable movie stars, models, and artists who became fodder for his prints and films, as well as a performance venue for The Velvet Underground. The prolific artist worked across painting, sculpture, and new media throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Always looking for current subject matter, during the 1980s he collaborated with several younger artists, including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente, and Keith Haring. After his death in 1987, the artist’s estate became The Andy Warhol Foundation and in 1994, a museum dedicated to the artist and his oeuvre opened in his native Pittsburgh. Today, his works are held in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Tate Gallery in London, among others.

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